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Classical Music programming of National Public Radio
  A violist memorializes lost voices at Terezin concentration camp
Scott Simon talks with violist Mark Ludwig about his efforts to preserve - and play - the music written by some of the many musicians imprisoned and killed at the Terezin concentration camp.   (20 November)
  The curious mind — and hard work — of bassist Christian McBride
The Grammy-winning bassist, bandleader and broadcaster talks about his love for music, family ties in the jazz world, and the thrill of sitting in with Wynton Marsalis as a teenager.   (16 November)
  The Philadelphia Orchestra returns to China for anniversary of historic 1973 trip
NPR's Juana Summers speaks with violinist Davyd Booth, who was part of the Philadelphia Orchestra's historic 1973 tour of China.   (11 November)
  A disciplined plea for peace – and quiet – from composer Arvo Pärt
A new album of music by the 88-year-old Estonian mystic seems to put an arm around you and whisper, "In troubled times, music can help."   (11 November)
  The world's largest musical instrument is in the mountains of Virginia
Luray caverns in Virginia have been a natural landmark for 50 years. They also hold the world's largest musical instrument, a Stalacpipe organ.   (6 November)
  Emerson String Quartet: Tiny Desk Concert
In one of its very final performances ever, the durable and beloved string quartet says farewell with music by Beethoven, Walker and Ravel.   (6 November)
  Conrad Tao and Caleb Teicher: Tiny Desk Concert
In our very first tap dancing Tiny Desk, the artists created an experience so unexpectedly fresh and suffused with joy, it moved some to tears and others to cheer for more.   (3 November)
  Malcolm X arrives — finally — at New York's Metropolitan Opera
An opera about civil rights leader Malcolm X opens Friday — nearly 40 years after X: The Life and Times of Malcolm X premiered. The creative team says its message feels more relevant than ever.   (3 November)
  Hauschka's prepared piano is a layered canvas of sounds in new album
On Philanthropy, the artist's 14th studio album, Volker Bertelmann, also known as Hauschka, returns to his signature prepared piano sound in music he hopes will strengthen connections between people.   (20 October)
  How Corinne Bailey Rae and Theaster Gates are preserving Black culture
On her album, Black Rainbows, Bailey Rae was inspired by the art, books and magazines at the Stony Island Arts Bank, a repository for Black history on Chicago's South Side, created by Gates.   (17 October)
  Even Beethoven got bad reviews. John Malkovich reads them aloud as 'The Music Critic'
A new live stage show features actor John Malkovich transformed into some of the meanest music critics ever — in real reviews skewering the work of great composers like Beethoven, Brahms and Chopin.   (17 October)
  From opera to breakdancing and back again: Jakub Józef Orlinski fuses two worlds
Polish countertenor and breakdancer Jakub Józef Orlinski talks about his new album with Il Pomo d'Oro orchestra.   (16 October)
  In Angélica Negrón's music, childlike wonder meets the pull of Puerto Rico
The Brooklyn-based composer talks about the artistic powers of her island homeland, writing scores for America's top orchestras and making music with plants.   (12 October)
  N.C. radio station reverses decision to withhold broadcast of contemporary Met operas
WCPE had deemed operas dealing with race and LGBTQ issues "unsuitable" for broadcast. They reversed course "after careful deliberation...and hearing from our supporters, listeners and the public."   (6 October)
  N.C. radio station reverses decision to withhold broadcast of contemporary Met operas
WCPE had deemed some operas dealing with race and LGBTQ issues "unsuitable" for broadcast. They reversed course "after careful deliberation...and hearing from our supporters, listeners and the public."   (6 October)
  Radio station faces swift backlash after it deems Met operas 'inappropriate'
WCPE says recent operas from the Metropolitan Opera are "unsuitable" for broadcast, including those dealing with race and LGBTQ issues. Critics of the station include musician Rhiannon Giddens.   (5 October)
  North Carolina radio station plans to reject broadcasts of 'inappropriate' Met operas
WCPE says that six contemporary operas being presented this season by the Metropolitan Opera — including ones dealing with violence, race and LGBTQ issues — are "unsuitable" for broadcast.   (30 September)
  American cellist hunts for Gaspar Cassadó's nearly lost treasures
American cellist Katie Tertell is seeking to recover from Japan forgotten manuscripts by Spanish composer Gaspar Cassadó.   (25 September)
  Víkingur Ólafsson, 'Variation No. 1 (Goldberg Variations)'
The young Icelandic pianist, once equated with Glenn Gould, exceeds the comparison in music by Bach that is played with transparent, lyrical joy.   (19 September)
  Allison Russell finds transformative musical power in community
With help from a sisterhood of musicians, the Canadian singer-songwriter and activist has triumphed over trauma to become a distinguished figure on the Americana scene.   (11 September)
  Anne Akiko Meyers: Tiny Desk Concert
The thoughtful violinist makes a set of contemplative music, including a piece by Philip Glass, sing sweetly on her $16 million instrument.   (7 September)
  Stars of the Lid co-founder Brian McBride has died at 53
In his work alongside bandmate Adam Wiltzie, McBride warped and wondered at new pathways for ambient music.   (31 August)
  After 12 years, pianist Awadagin Pratt rediscovers his sweet spot
Absent from the recording studio for more than a decade, the restless musician has commissioned six composers for his new album.   (25 August)
  Sarah Cahill: Tiny Desk Concert
The intrepid champion of new music turns her attention to female composers, offering a sampler of works by women across four centuries, including a favorite of Louis XIV and an Ethiopian nun.   (18 August)
  Opera singer David Daniels pleads guilty in sexual assault trial
The world-renowned countertenor and his husband were accused of drugging and raping a young singer in 2010.   (8 August)
  Composer Joan Tower is finally going easy on herself
With plenty of humor, the octogenarian talks about her far-reaching career — including why she fled the modernist school of composers — and some mysterious visitations from her dead heroes.   (8 August)
  After singer David Daniels' guilty plea, the victim speaks out
The opera star who once sang on stages around the world suddenly pleaded guilty to sexual assault on Friday. The assaulted man, singer Samuel Schultz, reflects on the experiences he has endured.   (8 August)
  Linguist John McWhorter views American music through a wide lens
The Columbia University professor and New York Times columnist traces the intersecting lines of race and music in American history.   (3 August)
  How composer Nicholas Britell created the sound of 'Succession'
Sunday's finale marks the end of Succession and its iconic opening theme. Composer Nicholas Britell reflects on shaping the show's signature sound over four seasons — and what he might do next.   (30 July)
  Incarcerated teens find escape in music and poems composed with artists
Teens in jail in Virginia collaborate with musicians to compose songs, write poetry and find their voices after run-ins with the law.   (30 July)
  Kaija Saariaho, the composer who explored color and light, has died at age 70
Saariaho, who battled a male-dominated educational system in her native Finland, forged a strong and singular voice in contemporary music.   (30 July)
  Juilliard fires former chair after sexual misconduct investigation
Composer Robert Beaser has been fired from the renowned performing arts conservatory after an independent investigation found that he had broken Juilliard policies and "misrepresented facts."   (30 July)
  Viking heritage inspires soothing lullabies from Icelandic pianist Gabríel Ólafs
Vikings were ruthless warriors, but also preserved art. This has inspired a new album of Lullabies for Piano and Cello from composer Gabríel Ólafs.   (30 July)
  On a new Sigur Rós album, warmth and light push through the darkness
ÁTTA, the band's first album in 10 years, sports an orchestra of strings, high-flying vocalism and its signature bittersweet melodies.   (30 July)
  Jeremy Dutcher, 'Ancestors Too Young'
Hear the outstanding vocalist, songwriter and activist in a supercharged performance that spotlights a crisis for Indigenous kids.   (30 July)
  Wild Up: Tiny Desk Concert
The 14-piece Los Angeles-based ensemble's performance of music by Julius Eastman is nothing less than an exuberant house party unto itself.   (30 July)
  From soil to stars, the new Aizuri Quartet album offers a space to think
The band's sophomore album, Earthdrawn Skies, connects the dots in wildly diverse music spanning eight centuries.   (30 July)
  Ted Hearne's choral work 'FARMING' raises food for thought
The composer, in a new collaboration with the Grammy-winning choir The Crossing, uses the words of Jeff Bezos and William Penn to explore connections among farming, colonialism and capitalism.   (30 July)
  Alice Sara Ott: Tiny Desk Concert
The widely acclaimed pianist serves up nearly 200-year-old music by Chopin mixed with a contemporary work that looks back in time.   (30 July)
  Octavia Butler wrote a 'Parable' that became a prophecy — now it's also an opera
Octavia Butler's novel Parable of the Sower — depicting a dystopian U.S. in 2024 — was published 30 years ago. Toshi Reagon's new musical retelling explores the web of past, present and future.   (30 July)
  Hilary Hahn, 'Sonata No. 3, Ballade'
The intrepid violinist undertakes some of the most challenging solo violin music, marking the centenary of its creation by composer Eugéne Ysaÿe.   (30 July)
  Remembering André Watts, the American pianist who opened doors of possibility
The pianist, who died last week, was an inspiration to a generation of Black and brown musicians who followed in his pioneering footsteps.   (30 July)
  Minimalism: a story told in 8 pulses
In their new book On Minimalism, musicologists William Robin and Kerry O'Brien capture the lesser-known stories of the musical movement and its development, era by era.   (30 July)
  Yuja Wang, 'You Come Here Often?'
Hear the powerhouse pianist barrel through a rambunctious bonbon written for her by Michael Tilson Thomas.   (9 March)
  The lessons of Wayne Shorter, engine of imagination
Shorter's biographer, Michelle Mercer, recalls the many "isms" and lessons she learned from her time working with the legendary composer and saxophonist on his biography, Footprints.   (7 March)
  Does 'Tár' tell us anything about Mahler's 5th Symphony?
The music that haunts the Oscar-nominated film is a calling card for conductor Rafael Payare.   (7 March)
  NASA puts the sounds of the universe into a new album
NASA's Sonification Project is a collaborative effort to turn data collected from the outer reaches of the universe into sounds. Their album, Universal Harmonies, is out March 10.   (6 March)
  Missy Mazzoli is a symphonic composer with a photographer's eye
On her new album, Dark with Excessive Bright, the vibrant, young composer coaxes unusual sounds from a symphony orchestra.   (3 March)
  Jessie Montgomery, composing from a place of self-honor
Watch Lara Downes' conversation with the composer-in-residence of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra about balancing her roots, her craft and the shifting field of classical music.   (1 March)
  N.Y. Philharmonic chief looks to Gustavo 'Dudamel era' after historic appointment
New York philharmonic president and CEO Deborah Borda discusses the decisionmaking process behind bringing the superstar conductor to the Big Apple.   (21 February)
  From Beyoncé to Debussy, Yannick Nézet-Séguin shares music that inspires him
What do great conductors listen to when they're not on the podium? Nézet-Séguin made a playlist, specifically for Fresh Air, of music that inspires him (plus one of his cats' favorite songs).   (21 February)
  Prodigious fiddler Mark O'Connor celebrates 50 years of music with memoir
NPR's Leila Fadel speaks with Mark O'Connor about his memoir, Crossing Bridges, on his journey from multi-instrumentalist child prodigy to solo artist composing and performing on world stages.   (15 February)
  From Beyoncé to Debussy, Yannick Nézet-Séguin shares music that inspires him
What do great conductors listen to when they're not on the podium? Nézet-Séguin made a playlist, specifically for Fresh Air, of music that inspires him (plus one of his cats' favorite songs).   (15 February)
  N.Y. Philharmonic chief looks to Gustavo 'Dudamel era' after historic appointment
New York philharmonic president and CEO Deborah Borda discusses the decisionmaking process behind bringing the superstar conductor to the Big Apple.   (9 February)
  Gustavo Dudamel's new musical home is the New York Philharmonic
The New York Philharmonic announced Tuesday afternoon that the charismatic 42-year-old conductor will be taking on the music director designate post at the start of the 2025-26 concert season.   (8 February)
  Kalia Vandever, 'Temper the Wound'
Hear a meditative trombone improvisation, inspired by dreams, and powered by spiraling loops and gentle melodies.   (3 February)
  Jazz singer Samara Joy embraces the past while making music for the future
Watch Lara Downes' conversation with the 23-year-old, Grammy-nominated sensation about balancing the demands of a surging career and the women artists who paved the way.   (2 February)
  Lara Downes' season 3 of 'Amplify' launches with a theme of renaissance
NPR's Leila Fadel talks to pianist Lara Downes about her interview series Amplify, which examines how Black artists today might find themselves in a new cultural renaissance.   (2 February)
  Forensic musicologists race to rescue works lost after the Holocaust
The Exilarte Center in Vienna is the world's leading research institution devoted to preserving the work of composers such as Walter Arlen and others, who were exiled or killed during the Holocaust.   (30 January)
  As Ryuichi Sakamoto returns with '12,' fellow artists recall his impact
The composer has been lauded for decades over his deeply affective music; director Alejandro González Iñárritu, composer Hildur Guðnadóttir and more join us to explain why.   (27 January)
  For Missy Mazzoli, composing is the hard work of making life easier
The composer of Breaking the Waves speaks candidly about equity in her field, the importance of role models and the unglamorous side of writing music every day.   (26 January)
  Marc-André Hamelin: Tiny Desk Concert
Watch the pianist, who's been called "a performer of near-superhuman prowess," play a smart set that spans six centuries.   (12 January)
  Who says opera needs a grand stage? This festival is all about intimate productions
The PROTOTYPE festival, now in its 10th year, presents new operas and music-theater works in smaller settings. "We were trying to create a black box opera movement," says co-founder Beth Morrison.   (11 January)
  Lisel, 'One At A Time'
The singer makes four simple words into an Escher-esque puzzle built on loops and layers of her voice.   (6 January)
  This man's recordings spent years under a recliner — they've now found a new home
More than a century ago, a Met librarian made some of the first live music recordings. Now, (with an assist from NPR) 16 of the Mapleson Cylinders are joining the New York Public Library collection.   (5 January)
  Lyrics from 'One by One,' written by Connie Converse, will stay with you
We asked NPR Music's classical producer Tom Huizenga: Was there one lyric from 2022 that stayed with you all year? He chose a line from the song "One by One," recorded by Julia Bullock.   (28 December)
  Former music students accuse two Juilliard teachers of sexual misconduct
Three people have accused two teachers at the world-renowned music school — composers Robert Beaser and the late Christopher Rouse — of sexual misconduct dating back to the 1990s and 2000s.   (20 December)
  More than 500 musicians demand accountability after Juilliard misconduct allegations
After VAN magazine published accusations against Robert Beaser, a former head of The Juilliard School's composition department, hundreds of composers, educators and presenters are demanding change.   (20 December)
  The fantasia of Angelo Badalamenti, veil-piercing composer
Among other things Badalamenti's music, soft and bizarre and surging, was an emotional compass for the uncanny creations of director David Lynch.   (20 December)
  More than 500 musicians demand accountability after Juilliard misconduct allegations
After VAN magazine published accusations against Robert Beaser, a former head of The Juilliard School's composition department, hundreds of composers, educators and presenters are demanding change.   (19 December)
  The 100 Best Songs Of 2022 (60-41)
We ranked a list of 100 songs that reflects the sprawling, energetic messiness of 2022. Start listening.   (16 December)
  Former music students accuse two Juilliard teachers of sexual misconduct
Three people have accused two teachers at the world-renowned music school — composers Robert Beaser and the late Christopher Rouse — of sexual misconduct dating back to the 1990s and 2000s.   (13 December)
  The 50 Best Albums Of 2022
We ranked our 50 favorite records of the year, from hip-hop to classical and everything in between.   (12 December)
  The 50 Best Albums of 2022
We ranked our 50 favorite records of the year, from hip-hop to classical and everything in between.   (12 December)
  With a bold debut album, Julia Bullock curates an unconventional career
The velvet-voiced soprano with a career on the rise chooses her projects, and the music on her debut solo album, with consummate intention.   (9 December)
  The 10 Best Classical Albums of 2022
Discover a broad spectrum of this year's most compelling classical music, from booby-trapped string quartets and chilled-out piano to full-throttle percussion, electric guitars and high-flying vocals.   (8 December)
  Cellist Sheku Kanneh-Mason celebrates his eclectic inspirations
Cellist Sheku Kanneh-Mason speaks with NPR's Rachel Martin about growing up in a house filled with music, playing at Harry and Meghan's royal wedding and performing some of his favorite pieces.   (7 December)
  Nate Chinen's Favorite Music of 2022
Nate Chinen, editorial director for WRTI, shares some of his favorite music of the year.   (7 December)
  Three superstar divas power opera 'The Hours' - coming to movie theaters everywhere.
Kelli O'Hara, Renée Fleming, and Joyce DiDonato star in a new opera based on Michael Cunningham's book.   (6 December)
  Ukrainians sing 'Carol of the Bells' at Carnegie Hall, 100 years after its U.S. debut
A Ukrainian chorus first performed Shchedryk in the U.S. in 1922. A century later, during another fight for freedom, Ukrainian singers performed the folk song at the site of its North American debut.   (6 December)
  A rare recording of a musical by an 18-year-old Stephen Sondheim surfaces
Broadway-legend-in-training Stephen Sondheim was a college sophomore in 1948 when his musical Phinney's Rainbow was produced — and recorded — at Williams College in Massachusetts.   (5 December)
  The unplanned, unstoppable career of composer Tania León
Failure was not an option when Léon arrived in New York, a determined 24-year-old pianist from Cuba. At nearly 80, she says some things haven't changed.   (2 December)
  Ned Rorem, major American composer and diarist, has died at age 99
The Pulitzer Prize-winning composer and diarist died Friday at age 99. Although he won the Pulitzer for an orchestral work, he was most celebrated for his huge body of art songs — over 500 in all.   (18 November)
  In the devastation of climate change, Daniel Bachman captures what's left behind
In field recordings and fingerstyle guitar, Bachman's diaristic Almanac Behind documents cataclysmic weather as it becomes a larger part of our lives.   (17 November)
  Sheku Kanneh-Mason: Tiny Desk Concert
Watch the rising young cellist transform a Bob Marley classic, explore brand new preludes and unspool a weepy Welsh ballad.   (15 November)
  When she left Ukraine, an opera singer made room for a most precious possession
She and her daughter carried one small suitcase for toiletries, clothes and shoes. But she made sure she had room for a few items with deep sentimental value.   (7 November)
  What's making us happy: A guide to your weekend listening and viewing
Each week, the guests and hosts on NPR's Pop Culture Happy Hour share what's bringing them joy. This week: Bono's memoir, the Philly Orchestra playing Dancing On My Own, and Tove Lo's Dirt Femme.   (5 November)
  Evgueni Galperine, 'Loplop im Wald'
If you could hire a composer to score your dreams, Evgueni Galperine just might be your man.   (3 November)
  The Crossing: Tiny Desk Concert
Hear what's been called "America's most astonishing choir" sing brand new music by Shara Nova that looks at how we handle difficult emotions.   (24 October)
  A Far Cry & Shara Nova, 'We are as paper'
Hear vocalist and composer Shara Nova in a mesmerizing moment from a new song cycle, The Blue Hour, written by five celebrated women.   (18 October)
  Our biggest orchestras are finally playing more music by women. What took so long?
As the new concert season gets underway, composers and orchestra administrators say they are feeling a shift in whose music gets heard.   (17 October)
  Celebrating the 150th birthday of British composer Ralph Vaughan Williams
Collecting traditional tunes from all over the British Isles, Vaughan Williams famously produced gently modal folksong fantasies evoking England's "green and pleasant land."   (12 October)
  Stripped to the bones: Why a new NYC concert hall sounds so much better
The new David Geffen Hall in Lincoln Center, home of the New York Philharmonic, opens this week. And while the outside is the same, everything inside has changed.   (11 October)
  Conductor Marin Alsop on her upcoming performances at Carnegie Hall in New York City
NPR's Scott Simon speaks to conductor Marin Alsop about her upcoming performances with the São Paulo Symphony Orchestra at Carnegie Hall in New York City.   (11 October)
  How Italian opera influenced Mexican ranchera
The influence can be traced back to the 1800s when opera companies and their star singers traveled from Italy to perform across the country.   (11 October)
  Revisiting San Juan Hill, the neighborhood destroyed to make way for Lincoln Center
In New York City, the area dominated by Lincoln Center was formerly home to Black and Puerto Rican communities. Etienne Charles' new musical work addresses that difficult past.   (7 October)
  Steve Reich, 'Runner'
New to the music of Steve Reich? His latest recording, featuring the Los Angeles Philharmonic, may be his most approachable.   (5 October)
  Where are the Black musicians in the country's largest orchestras?
In 2014, a study found that only 1.4% of orchestra musicians were Black. In 2022, it's hard to know if that number is better or worse.   (30 September)
  Lizzo played James Madison's crystal flute onstage in D.C., proving history rocks
The Library of Congress had invited Lizzo to check out its flute collection during her tour stop. On Tuesday, she played a few notes on the historic instrument, twerked and declared history cool.   (29 September)
  A composer's meditation on the moment, blown up to immersive proportions
Seven months after it debuted at the Rothko Chapel in Houston, Tyshawn Sorey relaunches his work Monochromatic Light (Afterlife) on a monumental new scale in New York's Park Avenue Armory.   (28 September)
   
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